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George the Grunt

George the Grunt

Our George the grunt is named after the first (to my knowledge), fish trained enough to be in photos, by Bronson Hartley. Grunts are a little scatterbrained and act unsure and confused. It takes them a while to figure out exactly how the free food comes to be and how...
Porpita porpita

Porpita porpita

The blue button lives on the surface of the sea and consists of two main parts: the float and the hydroid colony. The hard float is round, almost flat, and about one inch wide. The hydroid colony, which can range from bright blue turquoise to yellow, resembles...
White Sponge

White Sponge

Though sponges are animal they do not have much you can see moving. Inside they have a whip (flagellum) who’s movement causes water flow. Dissolved organic matter, diatoms and other very small goodies stick to a mucous lined membrane and they call that lunch....
Octopus

Octopus

Octopus and squid are the most advanced of all mollusks. They are shape shifting masters of disguise. Like crustaceans they use copper rather than iron in their blood to transport oxygen.  Hence their blood is a greeny blue rather than red like ours. Perhaps the...
Glaucus Atlanticus

Glaucus Atlanticus

This is the rarest creature we have ever found. I am pleased my son Ben managed to get some photos before setting it back on its way. This mollusk has no shell as this would make it sink. It eats Portuguese-man-o-wars and keeps the powerful stingers as spoils of war...
Locust Lobster

Locust Lobster

This is a very primitive looking fellow. His MO is to use the paddle pushers on his front to turn over loose rock and eat the critters scuttling for safety. These crustaceans  are rare so they are not on restaurant menus and most lobster divers would leave them alone...